Shades of Masculinity at NYFWM: Military Men by Kenneth Ning and Sailor Styles by Matiere

Behold, two distinct archetypes of masculinity.

Inspiration comes in many forms, and from different periods of life. While I have explored how period inspiration can craft fashion, I found the juxtaposed presentations of military versus sailor life to be most fascinating at New York Fashion Week Mens (NYFWM). Not so much because of the individual interpretations of the respective designers, but more so because of the disparate sources of inspiration in these masculine forms of yester-living.

Kenneth Ning‘s presentation was called “Full Metal Jacket”, a namesake of the movie itself. Ning chose to convey fun tones between the lines of the 1987 British-American war movie by Stanley Kubrick.

Almost apocalyptic in styling, the dominant hues were the military greens and browns, alongside blacks and greys to symbolize the rigors of life in the military.

kenneth ning new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

There were several suits with a plethora of pockets, one which caught my fancy due to its utilitarian element: navy with silver zippers and a plethora of stashworthy pockets all over the jacket and trousers.

kenneth ning new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

There were many camo jacquard suit jackets – one particularly long and enticing in black and white. Alongside were sleeveless vests, long shirts and baggy trousers, all in rugged plaid or plain patterns with some signs of wear and distress. While some shirts were doubled and layered, some were mismatched, as if borrowed from the military itself, and many had interesting accents and detailing and accessories which mandated a closer peer. Much to the discomfort of the military style frozen models!

kenneth ning new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabhkenneth ning new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

A black bomber style anorak nylon rip-stop jacket, with layers of destruction and crinkle, was another favorite, perhaps owing to its utility as a luggage carrier and weather protector.

kenneth ning new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

Taking a dive into another form of masculinity was Matiere, paying homage to the roots of San Francisco, a city that I have fallen in love with for its culinary point of view. Designer Scot Shandalove named this the “Dead Sea” collection, complete with large sails in red, white and blue behind the similarly hued models.

matiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

The back story was that the designer sold tie dye shirts by following the Grateful Dead, as he traveled along the California coast in the 80s, taking breaks in concerts aplenty. He brought the hues to life in a slightly more sailor-style collection, where the focus was on color: pigment sprays, overdyed shirts, dip dyes and ombre hues all over. As a nod to the humble beginnings, the collection truly tied my favorite element of travel into his vision of style.

matiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

Given San Francisco‘s coastal location, fabrics for his styles were also imported: Japanese raw silk terry, cottons, waterproof nylon, all in sea blues and sun faded colors. The color combinations were reminiscent of men in the seas, often paired with dip dyed linen or wide seersucker stripes.

matiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

The former was a favorite, in a rusty blue burnout fabric.

matiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

Many models sported sunglasses, a Californian staple. And while limited to shades of red, white and blue, the colors were a nod to the Painted Ladies houses, an icon of the Bay Area.

matiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabhmatiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

When San Francisco comes to mind, I cannot help but think of its cool temperatures all year round, an unlikely expectation from California. Which is why I liked the waterproof and translucent nylon outerwear piece for its sheer functionality.

matiere new york fashion week mens nyfwm menswear @sssourabh

With such disparate threads of masculinity on display, I liked that menswear had reached a pedestal where, similar to women’s fashion weeks, styles could be delineated into moods, occasions, and symbolic metaphors, too.

So, military or sailor styles?

 

13 responses to “Shades of Masculinity at NYFWM: Military Men by Kenneth Ning and Sailor Styles by Matiere

  1. Pingback: MMXVII: A Roman Holiday with Cadet at NYFWM | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  2. Pingback: A Story of Colors and Leopards Emerging from Darkness: Robert Geller at NYFWM | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  3. Pingback: Ethnic Shirts and Flowing Kaftans: The Luxe Nomads by Palmiers du Mal at NYFWM | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  4. Pingback: The Modern Riviera by Nautica at NYFWM | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  5. Pingback: Secret Agents Styled in Havana Nights by Nick Graham at NYFWM | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  6. Pingback: A Melting Pot of Styles by Vivienne Hu at NYFW | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  7. Pingback: Powerful Contrasts and Stylish Juxtapositions by Taoray Wang at NYFW | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  8. Pingback: Neon, Metal and Pop: Son Jung Wan at NYFW | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  9. Pingback: Fresh and Spunky Designers from San Francisco’s Academy of Art at NYFW | 3FS: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  10. Pingback: The Impact of Politics on Menswear and Fashion: NYMD at NYFWM | 3FS Lifestyle: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  11. Pingback: Utilitarian and Geometric Designs by Brett Johnson at NYFWM | 3FS Lifestyle: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  12. Pingback: A Refined Man of the Punk Era: Matiere at NYFWM | 3FS Lifestyle: Food Fashion Frameworks·

  13. Pingback: Intelligence and Tech for Fashion by Kenneth Ning at NYFWM | 3FS Lifestyle: Food Fashion Frameworks·

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s